Easy to Make

11 Easy 3D Printed Sundials For You To Make

3D printed sundial

Ever thought about letting the sun do the work of telling the time? Here are the nicest free 3D printed sundial designs we could find. 

You want a sundial for your garden or balcony? That’s actually an easy thing to get. You don’t have to buy one from a store – just 3D print it.

So, how does it work?

  1. First, you chose a free design of your choice.
  2. Next you 3D print the piece. If you don‘t own a 3D printer, you can have them 3D printed by a professional 3D printing service (to get the best price, please continue here). You also have to choose the right material. PLA filament prints can deform when standing to extreme heat, also it might change color when you expose it to intense sunlight. If you want longer lasting prints, we’d suggest you choose ABS or PET filament.
  3. After printing, you have to get the alignment right. This is no easy task, but here’s a great instruction on how to do the setup.

So, without further ado: Here are the best designs we could find.

3D Printed Sundial #1: Digital Sundial

3D printed sundials digital sundial

How does it work? This 3D printed sundial really differs from the others. It doesn’t show what time by casting a shadow, it shows you the time like a digital watch would do! The shape has been designed mathematically to show the correct time. It displays time from 10:00 until 16:00 and updates every 20 minutes. do build it, you don‘t need much: You add an empty jam jar, three 20mm M6 flat head screws, one M6 flat head screw with the length of 50mm, four M6 nuts and four M6 washer with an outside diameter of <14mm.

Who made it? Thingiverse User Mojoptix.

Complexity: The print itself is not very complicated, but you should make sure it’s done with “high-quality” settings. There are some additional things you need for assembly.

Where can I get it? You find more information here.  


3D Printed Sundial #2: Gnomeon

3D printed sundials sundial gnomeon

How does it work? “This was just too obvious”, writes the designer. We couldn’t agree more. This Gnome could be found in any European garden, but in fact it’s a 3D printed sundial in the shape of a garden gnome. The hand of the clock is attached at his shaped cap which throws a shadow and the ground to show what time it is.

Who made it? The gnome was designed by the Thingiverse user KingRahl.

Complexity: Easy. It’s just one part to 3D print.

Where can I get it? Download it here.

3D Printed Sundial #3: Sundial Watch (Flintstone Style)

3D printed sundials sundial watch

How does it work? This is a classic prop to be seen in the “Flintstone” cartoons. This archaic watch isn’t your normal timekeeper – it’s portable, as you attach it to your arm with velcro strips. In order to get the right time, need a compass to get the right bearing. Also, the exactness of the time depends on your location. As there are so many variables, you only can expect rough time estimates. Nice gimmick, though.

Who made it? It was designed by the Thingiverse User edder’.

Complexity: Difficult because it requires time and work.

Where can I get it? Right here.

3D Printed Sundial #4: Bowstring Equatorial

3D printed sundials bowstring equatorial sundial

How does it work? The Bowstring Equatorial 3D printed sundial is adaptive for both Hemisphere and a large range of latitude. A beautiful, almost classical design.

Who made it? Thingiverse user alany.

Complexity: 3D printing the parts should be pretty easy, but there are some parts to assemble.

Where can I get it? Get it here.

3D Printed Sundial #5: Shell Style

3D printed sundials sundial #1

How does it work? This 3D printed sundial is a pretty regular model with an interesting design. You arrange the top to the south and then you can see what time it is when you follow the shadow. Down in the middle, it’ll show 12 o’clock. The stripes go to the left up from 1:00 to 5:00 and to the right down from 11:00 o’clock to 7:00 o’clock. The shell-inspired design also can hold a compass for aligning the 3D printed sundial.

Who made it? It was made by Tatsuya Osaka.

Complexity: It’s relatively easy to print.

Where can I get it? Download it here.

3D Printed Sundial #6: Circular Model

3D printed sundials sundial #2

How does it work? This circular 3D printed sundial is also a normal one. It’s just one part to 3D print. To use it, you only have to arrange the digit XII to the north.

Who made it? It was made by Pinshape user Danowall.

Complexity: It’s a relatively easy object to 3D print. 

Where can I get it? Get it here.


3D Printed Sundial #7: Shark Fin Sundial

3d printed sundials sundial #3

How does it work? This small 3D printed sundial is calibrated to show time at all places on the latitude of 50.4 degrees. The closest city is Kamloops, Canada and also Brighton, Hove, Exeter, Plymouth in England; Maastricht, Brussels, Cologne, Kiev, Frankfurt am Main, Prague, Krakow … you can go even +_ 1 degree and include London, Cardiff, Calgary, Ghent, Antwerp, Luxembourg … check the link to find out the latitude of your city.

Who made it? It was made by the staff of MyMiniFactory.

Complexity: Easy. You can apply some paint to the numbers.

Where can I get it? Available here.

3D Printed Sundial #8: Replica of Tower Hill Sundial, London

3d printed sundials sundial in tower hill 1

How does it work? This piece is a miniature replica of the well-known Tower Hill Dial in London, which was unveiled at August the 3rd in 1992 and designed by the architects John Chitty and Mike Duffie and the sculptor Edwin Russel.

Who made it? It was created in the wake of the Scan The World project at MyMiniFactory.

Complexity: It’s an easy print.

Where can I get it? Get the files right here.

3D Printed Sundial #9: Tower Hotel

3d printed sundials tower hotel sundial 1

How does it work? It is another miniaturized timepiece. The original can be found in front of the Tower Hotel near Tower Bridge in London.

Who made it? It was designed for the Scan The World project of MyMiniFactory.

Complexity: Easy.

Where can I get it? Download it here.

3D Printed Sundial #10: David Harber Sundial in Putney, London

3d printed sundials david harber 1

How does it work? This is the miniature 3d printed version of a large bronze, standing in Putney, London. It was made by the sundial maker David Harber in 1999.

Who made it? You guessed it: It was rendered by the Scan The World project of MyMiniFactory.

Complexity: Easy.

Where can I get it? Download the files here.

3D Printed Sundial #11: Customizable Version

3d printed sundials customizable sundial

How does it work? This one’s for makers. The 3D printed sundial is designed for the northern hemisphere (check your exact latitude and longitude here). After that, the second step is to find the right timezone you live in here. The third and last step is to use OpenSCAD to enter your data and make a custom piece. There are detailed instructions at this Thingiverse page.

Who made it? It was developed by doctec.

Complexity: Difficult, because you have to customize it.

Where can I get it? Available here.

Did we miss any 3D printed sundial? If yes, please add to the comments.