Beautiful Design Pieces

You’ve Heard About 3D Printed Lamps. But What’s an Explosion Welded Table?

Explosion Welding

If you fancy a new table but aren’t interested in conventional choices, you should consider this beauty. It was done with a technique called “explosion welding”.

Janne Kyttanen is a Finnish conceptual artist. He created two new 3D printed furniture pieces that were unveiled this week during Design Miami 2015.

One of these pieces, known as the Metsidian table, has been created using an interesting technique called “explosion welding”.

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The sculptural table is shaped like the prow of a ship. It was constructed using a block of obsidian – a dark volcanic rock that appears to be glass like. This material then slowly shifts into a 3D printed copper lattice, to create a fascinating conceptual art piece.

Kyttanen, also the founder of Freedom of Creation, said: “The result is a compelling metamorphosis; the impossible becomes reality. Metsidian traverses the boundary between sculpture and furniture, a harmonious union of otherworldly form and everyday function.”

Here’s How The Metsidian Table Was Made

Explosion welding was vital to fuse the metal and volcanic rock. This process involves chemical explosives being used to bond materials that can’t be combined with conventional welding.

Kyttanen said: “At present we’re able to use explosion welding to join materials that wouldn’t naturally fuse together – what if we could control this force digitally? What kind of hybrid matter could we create?”


The Sedona Table

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The Sedona Table is the second piece show by Kyttanen. It is made from reflective bronze and has an unusual shape with solid legs and an irregular triangular grid top. The piece is supposed to reference the sandstone formations of Arizona.

Kyttanen is well known for experimenting with 3D printing and has created many pieces over the years, which he also showed in Miami.

A 3D Printed Lamp From Janne Kyttanen

Avoid Lamp

These included the Avoid light. This 3D printed lamp comes in the shape of a hoop that’s formed from a hollow metallic grid and plated in 24 karat gold. Also, his copper plated Avoid stool was shown along with the bronze Macedonia tray, which was based on the shapes of soap bubbles.

Although you have missed Design Miami 2015, be sure to check out some of these futuresque 3D printed designs on Kyttanen’s website.

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