Author image of Mika Yeap

Mika Yeap

By Mika Yeap

May 16, 2019
Featured image of Artec 3D Releases the Micro, a Metrology-Grade Desktop 3D Scanner
Big Little Details
Artec 3D Releases the Micro, a Metrology-Grade Desktop 3D Scanner

Luxembourg-based 3D scanner manufacturer Artec 3D has just unveiled the Artec Micro, a desktop-sized, metrology-grade scanner for small objects. Boasting easy operation and exceptional results, the scanner broadens Artec's offerings to new fields.

May 13, 2019
Featured image of Handy STL File Bulk Viewer for Windows PCs
Organized chaos
Handy STL File Bulk Viewer for Windows PCs

Got a folder full of STL files that you don't recognize? This handy utility will generate previews of them so you can make sense of the mess.

May 13, 2019
Featured image of From the Ashes: The Return of Printrbot?
Can't Keep a Good 'Bot Down
From the Ashes: The Return of Printrbot?

Printrbot had produced well-loved, iconic machines since the dawn of the consumer 3D printing revolution, at least until mid-2018 when it shuttered operations. But latest news suggests that the veteran manufacturer is planning a comeback.

May 10, 2019
Featured image of 3D Print Your Own Construction System – Introducing Polypanels
Because Lego Is so Mainstream
3D Print Your Own Construction System – Introducing Polypanels

Polypanel is a 3D printable library of interlocking pieces that can be used to build all manner of functional models - just print some and you'll be building things in a snap.

May 8, 2019
Featured image of Carbon-reinforced Parts 3D Printed for Luxury Catamaran
High-stakes 3D printing at sea
Carbon-reinforced Parts 3D Printed for Luxury Catamaran

As if 3D printing carbon-reinforced parts weren't hard enough, Swiss Scheurer GmbH did it big - and they did it on a luxury catamaran.

May 6, 2019
Featured image of 3D Printed Metal Parts to be Frozen for Fault Testing
Best serve chilled
3D Printed Metal Parts to be Frozen for Fault Testing

Metal 3D printing is now common in applications that require high strength parts, but checking these parts for faults is still a challenge. A professor from the University of Cincinnati aims to solve this problem by freezing them in ice.